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>> hi, everyone. welcome to the "journal" coming to you live from dw in berlin. the u.s. president defies a fragile economy and high unemployment to win the election, telling the american people the best is yet to come. >> appeals from angela merkel to her european partners -- an end to the eurozone debt crisis will require more unity. >> and a parliamentary vote on another round of austerity cuts in greece. >> thanks for joining us. barack obama has won his second term in office as president of the united states, but his celebrations will be short-lived as the multitude of urgent issues on his desk draws him back to work without delay. >> the first order of business will be to negotiate a new budget deal in congress by the end of the year. otherwise, and harsh plan of spending cuts and tax increases are due to go into effect. we will hear more about that later on in the show, but first, a look back at how things play out on election night in the u.s. >> his face said it all -- president barack obama had to fight hard to keep his job in a tough race against his republican challenge
at 9:15, the impact of new leadership in china on u.s. relations. president obama traveling in parts of asia. we will have those segments, plus, we will take a look at the papers and take your phone calls as well "washington journal ."shington, we will see you then. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> next, a discussion on the future of u.s. diplomacy. after that, a forum on the effectiveness of al-qaeda in yemen. >> a former state department officials from the obama and george w. bush administration's discuss public diplomacy in a tough budget in vermont. the discuss the effectiveness of student exchange programs and government-backed broadcasting outlets, like "voice of america." the george washington school of international affairs hosted this event tuesday. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> that is public diplomacy in action. [laughter] i'm a professor here at gw and the director of the institute for public policy and global communication. you can find us on twitter @ip dgc. we're also on fa
>>> dememracy in america. voters in the u.s. decide who they think should lead the country. one man has spent the past four years reshaping how americans see their country and how america is seen around the world. u.s. president barack obama took the wheel of an economy that resisted efforts to write it. now voters are deciding whether to stick with him or whether his republican opponent mitt romney deserves the job. eyewitness news line will focus all day on the race for president. >>> millions of americans are still voting. millions are already making their choices and already we're getting some hints about who they chose. our partners at abc news project barack obama will capture 3 electoral votes and mitt romney 33. >>> let's take a look at the projections state by state. the states in blue are for obama. the runs in red for romney. romney in south carolina, indiana, and kentucky. the projections give obama 3 electoral votes and they hope the number adds up to 270 or more needed to win the election. obama and the first lady arrived at home in chicago. the president wrapped hip h
with five u.s. airlines including alaska, american, delta, united and u.s. airways, we anticipate the t.s.a. precheck will be in 35 airports by the end of the year with b.w.i., san francisco, and orlando airports all coming online this week. an additional airlines will be coming onboard >> all of this briefing in our c-span networks. we'll take you live to the white house for the briefing with jay carney. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. thanks for being here. i have a brief statement to read at the top which is that today the president was able to continue returning messages of congratulations from his counterparts around the world. each call he thadged his counterpart for their friend -- thanked his counterpart for their friendship and expressed his desire for close cooperation moving ahead. the president spoke with president karzai of afghanistan, the prime minister of italy, the king of joshedian -- jordan, qatar, president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering
performed by national captioning institute] >> the u.s. house gavels in to begin their first bit of legislative work starting the lame duck session, four bills including on asthma inhalers and gavel back out when they finish to return for votes at 6:30 and we expect them to swear in a number of members filling out the remainder of terms for the 112th congress. we expect those to happen during the upcoming votes at 6:30 this evening. the senate also in session today and they have been dealing with a bill drk working on rules to federal land to federal hunting and fishing and the house and senate committees getting under way this week. the intelligence committees in particular off the floor, the intelligence committee of the senate and the house will be meeting in closed session to look at the attack in libya in benghazi this week. tomorrow on c-span 3, we will be covering a hearing looking at the meningitis outbreak. that is tomorrow morning at 10:00 eastern, c-span 3. the president will be hosting a news conference. we do not know the time of the news conference yet. this will be
elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
clear yesterday that he is open to new ideas. the u.s. cannot afford tax cuts that were passed 10 years ago -- over 10 years ago now. he feels that the most fair way to pick our revenue shortfall is by raising revenue from the very top. >> explained to everyone, if you can. under balsams and, it was predicted that we have -- bowl es-simpson, it was predicted that we would have 16 trillion dollars. even if you have that, why is that ok to have 22 trillion dollars of debt at in 10 years? by the is that considered still a good thing to do? -- why is that considered still a good thing to do it? >> the best capacity is the size of the debt relative to the economy. what the president has proposed is to put us on a path where the debt is stabilized and we are coming down relative to gdp. >> it is still 100% of gdp. >> i would explain a little bit about the numbers. that is the 16 trillion dollar figure that you mentioned earlier. i do nothing that is inappropriate way of measuring our debt. it is not the measure of that that is economic relevant. >> ten or 12? >> closer to 12. >> ok. the unemp
it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on it again. >> mr. turner? >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for being here. i appreciate your leadership i want to particularly thank you for your work on sexual assault which and you were working on with the secretary of the va in your efforts to change the culture throughout the dod to prevent sexual assault and assist the victims. the members have been of service members and families transition and out of the military secretary panetta of the most important things transition with a family is obviously that raises the issue of
is president and ceo of the windstream corporation, he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg. gentlemen, thank you. >> guest: thank you. >> just ahead, a series of discussions by the world affairs council of america exploring national security issues facing the u.s. up first, former national security adviser steven hadley. he talks about the economic impact on national security. then a panel of former ambassadors discusses relations between the u.s. and pakistan. after that former middle east envoy dennis ross talks about iran, israel and u.s./middle east policy. and later, a look at the aftermath of the arab spring including the ongoing syrian civil war and the challenges facing egypt after its revolution. >> later today, singers and musicians roger daltrey and pete townsend of the who will be at the national press club to talk about the program they co-founded to help improve the lives of teenagers and young adults with cancer. they'll also discuss their plans for a new initiativ
significant emphasis. for example, in 2010, the pentagon set up this u.s. cybercommand and the eu has a similar organization. the uk has the same thing. they have a cybersecurity operations center and this is the british equivalent in this area. let's just go through some of the terminology. i wanted to make sure that we have some particular knowledge about things. as i go through these special events, the backdoor is an overlooked entry into a network. it allows a hacker or someone were someone who was not authorized to be in there to get in with a password -- without a password. this is where you have a program that becomes a robot of the person on the outside. cookies are a friend when we are trying to order something. i'm going to give you some examples as we go. now where is malicious software. malware can be a virus 40 warm. we also have the concept where did these e-mails that are alluring you to respond. you might even respond to such a little ad. spearfishing is trying to get you to respond and it is that is the concept that it is targeted at you. because you have access to s
- door hearings about the september 11 attack that the u.s. consulate in libya. then the senate armed services committee confirmation hearings to lead u.s. and nato forces in afghanistan. then a national security adviser previews the upcoming trip of the president 2000 -- southeast asia. former federal reserve chairman alan greenspan and paul volcker are part of a forum on the so- called fiscal cliff, the impending budget cuts and tax increases that start in january unless congress reaches a deal. we bring that to you live, starting 8:15 on c-span 2. the house and senate intelligence committee held meetings looking into the libya. -- the attacks in libya. acting cia director and the intelligence directorate among witnesses. next we hear from house select intelligence committee ranking member, diane feinstein and the vice chairman. this is 20 minutes. accent? i think what is important about the hearing is the fact that members of the intelligence committee were able to get a lot of facts. i think what really occurred as far as benghazi was concerned, we went through a timeline. we went
committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: we are just hours away from polls opening on the east coast. it could be a long night. only time will tell how this raised will turn out in history, but history is. we want to bring you a unique project from oliver stone. the two have teamed up for an unprecedented showtime series called the untold history of the united states. the show kicks off on showtime and also features his companion botook. first of preview of the untold history of the united states. >> roosevelt made his solos move yet. the stakes have rarely been higher in a presidential election, and roosevelt shows his secretary of agriculture as his running mate. wallace had been at the nerve center in sawing off the perils of the great depression, easing the way of government subsidies with farmers to stay in business by cutting back on production. wallace provided food stamps. he instituted programs for land use planning and soil conser
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader before assuming leadership of the library of congress 25 years ago. as chair of the library of congress caucus, it's been a great pleasure to work with dr. billington and his outstanding staff on a variety of issues and activities for members of congress. the caucus urges you to join speaker boehner today in the rayburn room at 11:00 a.m. as he honors dr. james billington and his exemplary quarter century of l
talk about u.s. links to the drug war and the thing that is so impossible? you have to read it in some specific story and also find a back door, some different way into it. that is always an important piece of the puzzle. >> to look at another aspect of this, and citizens, witnessing with their cameras all over the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wal
an additional burden. >>> u.s. defense secretary leon panetta is urging congress to strike a deal before the end of the year. that's to avoid a fiscal cliff which may result in a significant reduction in defense spending. the fiscal cliff is a term used to illustrate drastic fiscal tightening if congress fails to reach an agreement by year's end. such a situation is feared to trigger a plunge in the economy. panetta warned that defense spending will be subject to drastic cuts if lawmakers failed to reach a consensus. >> the worst thing that could happen from my perspective is that they just kick the can down the road. all that would wind up doing is continuing to present a shadow over the defense department and for that matter, the rest of government. >> the defense department is already planning to reduce its budget by about $500 billion over the coming ten years. panetta has voiced concern that further cuts could undermine barack obama's new defense strategy that lays more emphasis on the asia pacific region. >>> japanese officials are scratching their heads about how to deal with sluggish tra
. >>> also, the prospect of a big promotion for the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, etch though he's been the target of republican attacks for weeks. up high! ok. don't you have any usefull apps on that thing? who do you think i am, quicken loans? ♪ at quicken loans, our amazingly useful mortgage calculator app allows you to quickly lculate your mortgage payment based on today's incredibly low interest rates... right from your iphone or android smartphone. one more way quicken loans is engineered to amaze. ♪ campbell's has 24 new soups that will make it drop over, and over again. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to creamy gouda bisque. see what's new from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ fema
difficult to deal with? why is the u.s. a decade into the war unable to go on patrol with afghans? >> one of the reasons is geographical. if you look at this relief map here, the border between afgh afghanistan and pakistan is very artificial. i've crossed the border many times. every time illegally. and the mountains that descend from the high table land of central asia to the steamy in this river valley, it's a very gradual descent. it's the same indough-islamic civilization on both sides of the border. so the sides that the u.s. military and diplomatic core is going to make two separate well functioning states out of it is somewhat adverse to geology. >> what's really going on, we tlinch are good guys and bad guys but there are guys the pakistans supports, the guys that india has sup pored, the russia has intended -- >> india is a big player here, fareed. because if you look through indian history from the guptas to the mull rans, the moguls, the dynasty, others, what you see is for many periods of indian history or sub continent history, the same empire that controlled the northern th
timetable. if they don't see that it would be inconsistent with maintaining a aaa rating. the u.s. is on negative outlook. s&p already downgraded. >> i think that we all kind of remember what happened -- i think that the big worry on the left side would be i think listen, nothing happened. interest rates went down again. that's a scare tactic. i'll use a scare tactic. $600 billion in new taxes january 1. that's reality. >> unemployment going back to 9.1 if this happens. that's a number that gets your attention. the "times" does a nice piece about fix the debt group. groups of very large companies trying to weigh in on their own side with ads. i don't know if we have them right now. nike with a mock nike ad that says just fix it. mcdonald's saying i'm fixing it. >> home depot. we can fix it. >> that group raised a lot of money over the last year or so. $30 million, $40 million, more than you might have anticipated to mount this public campaign. >> dave is doing a lot of great things. ceo of honeywell. wants to put aside -- i don't know if he's a democrat or republican. i know he's
administration had against him, had tried against him. because syria was -- opposed the u.s. led invasion of iraq in 2003. the syrian government was looking the other way or even supporting jihaddists who were entering into iraq and killing american and allies forces. so the u.s. and syria were on opposite sides of the street, to say the least. he survived that. he survived the association with the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february of 2005, in a damning un report that was leaked that held syria responsible. he survived all that and actually emerged in somewhat flying colors by 2008-2009, accepted back into the regional order, into the international community, even representatives at an anational plows meeting to jump start the arab-israeli peace talk. so i think he developed a sense of survivalism. he and his supporters. to the point where, when you have another challenge, and the most serious to date, obviously, since march 2011 and continuing today, that sense of triumphantism, that they're on the right side of history, sense of destiny, and i sincerely believe if i ta
to train. specialist nelson is just one of 60 -- 60 u.s. service members who have been killed this year by the afghans that they were sent to train. i don't know where the outrage is by the united states congress. i am very disappointed in both parties, their leadership to allow our young men and women to stay in a war that has no end to it, makes no sense to the american people. in fact, mr. speaker, the american people have said time after time, poll after poll that they want to bring our troops home now, not 2014 but now. on october 7, there was a national article written and the title was "a mother mourns a grim milestone," referring to the 2,000 american casualties from the afghan war. lisa freeman, who was interviewed in the article, who lost her son, captain matthew freeman, in 2009, he was shot by a sniper in afghanistan, ms. freeman said, i just sat here reliving the pain and wondering , where is america's outrage? where is america's concern that we're still at war? and mr. speaker, i made reference to this yesterday. the october 14 "new york times" editorial, and the title, "t
. you have been quoted as saying that there are very likely as many or more spies working against u.s. interests inside the u.s. during the cold war, which was a head snapping quote when i read it. who are these people and what are they after? >> i don't know that. i've been on the government for six years, but if you look at the value of intelligence, importance of intelligence in the expenditures of resources by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think a
will continue to watch that story for u.s. well. part of the mix to avoid the fiscal cliff is these jobless benefits. that is the headline in the politics and policy section of "the washington post." "over 2 million americans could lose their jobless benefits before the end of the year." host: susan, michigan, what do you think? should we cut medicare and social security? caller: absolutely not. absolutely not. host: why not? caller: i am a woman who has finally reached the age of social security. all the years the work, this money was taken out of my paycheck. i was told from a very young age that when i reached a fine age of the period where you retire and you can get social security, that all the money that i paid in would be refunded to me. this money is not to be touched, not to be changed. for my generation, or the generations that are coming after i am gone, to mess with social security is absolutely a travesty. it should never, ever retouched. host: president obama, meeting with labor leaders today, as well as other liberal groups, and also planning to meet with business leaders. he
that we're going. as the largest fuel consumer in the world today and by far the largest in the u.s. government, as i said, 93%, the department of defense has a special role to play, and moreover, because of our dependence on foreign sources of energy we continually send our men and women in uniform in harm's way to maintain that access to oil. the second criticism we often hear is that biofuels are too expensive. now, it is true that advanced biofuels are not yet in full production and so they can't compete with oil, since the oil market is a hundred years old, but d.o.d. investment has caused the price to drop dramatically over the last two years, and biofuels are more immune from price shots than -- than oil. there are also significant costs to traditional foreign sources of energy that are not shown at the gas pump. those costs are associated with protecting our shipping lanes and oil supplies and for over 60 years we've been trolling the -- patrolling the persian gulf, these costs for oil remain underappreciated. for our military the issue of energy security investment in biofu
on the u.s. military and diplomatic officials, to keep us safe and well. 9/11 brought terrorism to our homeland. two wars in iraq and afghanistan have placed around 60 million people in the taliban military. the current outbreak of new, dangerous infectious disease test our ability of strength. the commitment of america's health challenges on hiv/aids, malaria has elevated global health to a new and costly u.s. foreign policy subjective. for the leaders, using these commitments is not only the right thing to do but make sense at a strategic level. >> security has very closely tied together a very basic level we've recognized the health of the country is clearly linked to their prosperity and their productivity and their economic well-being. that is key to the stability. >> here at csis the one to understand the decade teach about the nexus between health and security. the senior men and women in our government and military have grappled with these issues. admiral william fallon, former head of both u.s. pacific and central command, spearheaded military engagement during a 48 year caree
and democratic attorney general. one of our two u.s. senators was an independent, elected twice. an independent missed winning the governorship by 15,000 votes over a million passed in 1973. we were the ticket splitting capital of america. we have cents settled back into partisan voting with the rest of america. this is a very polarized era. having said that, when you have close elections you still have a band of voters who will mix and match on the ballot, either because they want to mix and match or they are simply reacting to the individual candidates. in the case of romney and kaine, i have personally been in situations where straw votes were taken among large groups and you generally find you have 3, 4, 5% of the romney boaters picking tim kane for various reasons. some of these romney voters are more moderate republicans and the like tim kane better than his opponent. are there similar voters for obama and george allen? i am sure there are. i never met one of them. but i will say this -- george allen, despite what happened in 2006, he has won from time to time in running for statewide off
, and as recently as the 1990s, that number would have been in the 20s. u.s. exports in ten years went from 25% to developing countries to 50%. combined with what we heard about europe and in a sense the demographic problems in japan, there's a shift in the international system you're going on, and a lot of those countries will also have challenges like in china with avoiding the middle income trap and the structural shift, but what i want to connect to is this stuff we're doing at home in the united states is not enough. the united states then needs an international economic strategy, some of the things that prime minister asner talked about so it leverages a domestic revival with a new international growth system because the old system is no longer going to exist in the old form, and we got rising economies, and you got markets there, africa grew at 5% a year for the decade before the crisis and now back on the growth progeek story. there's potential in all of them. >> can they keep up the pace of growth they demonstrated in the last ten years? we're already seeing china slow down. the last
forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of which has not been very much observed. i think we have ideas for iran. that will give really intrusive inspections. it will give the right for the international community to go where there is concern. not where iran is declaring. but then to pay for that is to lift the sanctions. and then we can have an outcome. and let the iranian people take care of it. it's not for the outside to do the regime change. >> thank you. we'll ta
candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. following responses to the que
, not the u.s. government, because i'm about to hammer them. we do not have the kind of leadership that required to have coalitions put together to deal with this situation. it is a soft power or hard power. and it may not happen properly anytime in the near future your remember that caveat. now, the other day i was reading through a book by save the children. it's about the children of syria. and if you haven't read this book and you want to understand what's happening in syria, i recommend you read it. but i assure you, you will feel very uncomfortable on page one. there are costs involved with the situation that could go on for generations, not just for now. generations. think about the children are going through now and how they will think about the west. the international community, their arab brothers, the reins, the russians, the chinese, the united states, and just about everyone else. even if this might be over in the next year or so, it will definitely not be over for those children. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. ambassador? >> i agree with most of what i heard from
is currently -- today he's the chief legal adviser of the u.s. state department. in other words, he advises the president on what international law. he's the american spokesman on international law. he was the dean of yale law school. he gave a major speech last week at georgetown law. harold coe wrote, quote: domestic courts must play a major role in coordinating u.s. domestic constitutional rules with the rules of foreign and international law to advance the broader development of a well-functioning international judicial system. well, think about that for a minute. american courts can't coordinate the law from international law. they won't have much influence over bear national law and foreign law, but they can coordinate american law. that's the influence american courts have. so in other words by definition, if this is true, if we coordinate american law with foreign international law, he would have to subordinate american law to foreign international law. it's the only way this would logically work. the fourth person i'm going to talk about for a minute is anne marie slaughter. she wa
, see that as a stabilizing function. at the end of the day when you have the capacity as u.s. military for power protection as well. that is a global capability, but that means their respective of choices that are made by other powers, we want the ability to sustain our presence in the asia-pacific, same is true around the globe. as you look at these different areas, i think there are terrific opportunities to engage with china on each of them. and to finally ask the question and try to answer the question the secretary clinton has been encased in for quite some time and that is, can we get a better answer than we physically had in the past to how a new rising power comes into the international system? in other words, can we do so without running significant risks or falling into conflict? >> thank you. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary said. in fact, the admiral locklear _ those points the other day in australia, talking about the engagement in that strategic trust again. it is interesting the chinese tend to look at the american asia-pacific pivot as a sort of containment
, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector reform and egypt would weaken the security service more than it already is because there's been very little security sector reform as i don't see evidence of that. but also some of these the assumption that you are necessarily going after the leaders inside the security sector or security sector reform i think is a misconce
of pharmacy and the u.s. food and drug administration, the answer appears to be yes. >> reporter: the committee opened with testimony from joyce lovelace. she is the widow of kentucky circuit judge eddie lovelace who died after receiving injections of steroid back pain medication produced by necc. she put a human face on one of the statistics saying quote, i can't begin to tell you what i have lost, my soulmate, my partner. words can't describe, end quote. the committee also called on the president of necc, barry caden. in fact he is on the stand right now. he tried to invoke his fifth amendment rights, he is refusing to testify. the committee is still going on the panel asking him question after question and in response each time he invokes his fifth amendment rights not to testify. the committee hearing continues. jenna, back to you. jenna: hopefully there are answers that serve us eventually. jonathan, thank you. >> reporter: certainly. rick: coming up a suspect arrested in a terrible plot. you will not believe he who he wanted to target. the investigation into a tragic plane
petraeus was supposed to testify before congress about the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. instead, cia director michael morrell will be questioned about the attack that killed chris stevens and three other americans. former cia director michael hayden said at some point petraeus should testify. >> general pet tray cause -- petraeus have personal insight because he visited libya after the attack and those owes. the timing it is mysterious. >> reporter: fox news learned that paula broadwell may have revealed classified information during a speech at her alma mater, the university of den verb. in that speech she suggests that petraeus knew almost immediately the attack was a terror attack possibly to free militia members. >> now i don't know if a lot of you heard this but the cia annex had taken a couple of libyan militia members prisoner and they think that the attack on the consulate was an effort to try to get the prisoners back. that is still being vetted. >> reporter: former cia director michael hayden says he thinks broadwell's information is wrong. she believes she di
that really did move to us consequential actions, 44'6" u.s. soldiers killed in iraq not to mention the other loss of life that occurred there. that really made a difference. and i would say that if you live in a glass house, don't throw stones. and there is no worthy reason to throw any stone at susan rice. >> very profound if you live in a glass house cast no stones. we've been joined by laura richardson from california. thank you for joining us here. this very unqualified woman of course spear headed efforts to bring the international sanctions against i ran, sanctions on -- iran, sanctions on north korea and has brought significant to bringing down kadafi. we now are going to hear from a very special colleague, terri sule from the seventh district of alabama. she has very special insight into the qualifications and integrity of susan rice. thank you for joining us. >> good morning. today i stand with my colleagues, proudly stand with my colleagues in expressing our outrage about the unfair attacks against the u.s. ambassador susan rice. these recent attacks are nothing short of offensive.
, but that all changed for me in october of 2008 when i got a call from my boss, u.s. attorney, mike garcia. he called me in the office, and i have the oh, my god, it's the principal's office feeling in the pit of the stomach. he handed me a printout, special inspector general, it was a piece of the legislation that congress passed authorizing treasury to borrow $700 billion to rescue wall street, bail out the banks, put us on a path supposedly to economic recovery. this piece i was not aware of was when they passed the law, congress created a brand new agency. when mike explained to me what was the agency was going to do, two functions, one a law enforcement agency, a fbi for the t.a.r.p. with guns, badges, special agents, knocking down doors, executing search warrants, taking criminals out of their homes, putting them in cuffs, and in jail. congress realized pushing out so much money it was inevitably going to draw criminal flies to the government honey, and they needed a law enforcement agency to protect the money. second was oversight to bring transparency giving reports to congress and to
. as of this weekend, for politicizing the attack on the u.s. consulate in libya, he's not only saying he would block susan rice from being nominated to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state if president obama makes that nomination, he now says he would block all nominations for anybody to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state until he feels satisfied that he, john mccain, has received the information that he wants to receive about libya. this coming from the man who didn't bother to show up to the three-hour briefing on libya that was in his committee last week. but he's not embarrassed by that. he wants america not to have a secretary of state until he gets what he wants. even though we don't know what it is that he wants. because it's definitely not more information, because when information is being offered, he's not showing up for the briefings. how did john mccain get to be the republican party's north star on foreign policy in 2012? i mean, senator mccain had a capital h heroic military career. being held as a prisoner of war and holding himself in circumstances as a prisoner o
see as the greatest challenge to the u.s. constitution in today's society? >> well, i did touch on an earlier. in terms of applying the constitution, i do think it is the technology. i mean, all of the dna is obvious for examples. you can be exonerated through dna evidence. far more often, it is used in the catch. is it a search and seizure with a tweezer full of skin and see if it matches something else. it is very difficult and there are difficult questions about that sort. we had a case with gps, you know, you could slap a gps on it and they have complete itinerary. it turned out that the guy was going in a direction typical of search and seizure. the new technology is a amazing. the technology is just amazing. it will be a good test to see how the framework they set up in the constitution can, as it has for more than 200 years, how it can be used in dealing with these new challenges. >> do you have a judicial philosophy that you apply? in interpreting these changes that could not have possibly been anticipated? >> i don't want the answer to be flippant, but the answer is no.
, ever. >> of u.s. army retired -- i was with you this morning you receive the medal of honor at the sheraton hotel in washington, d.c. i met your wife also in the elevator and had a good chat with her, too. i did not know if she is here or not, but i would sure like to meet her again. when i talked -- you have, long way. one i talked you that they. you were going to go to the white house that morning. and that when i met you at the hotel. there were a whole bunch of 173rd guys there and i was there for the funeral of a guy i served in vietnam with the guys -- too see ed burke be buried. you just happen to be there waiting to go to the white house. and maybe you do not remember that. i gave him my card and i said if i could help you in any way, let me know. i am still around. it was an honor to meet you. and i've got a grandson in the big red one in afghanistan right now, and he got wounded about three weeks ago. just took a few mortar fragments in the legs and was calling home and saying he was sticking with the outfit and not getting medically evacuate. i just want to say, h
, u.s. navy and the office of the director of national intelligence. embry-riddle aeronautical she has worked policy analysis, operations, information security, you name it. she went to a small school in vermont, st. michael's college. means she is a purple light. she is a purple knight. please give her a warm round. ound. ms. mary rose mccaffrey. >> can everybody hear me? i was asking if everybody thought i was giving out halloween candy for such a full audience. i want to thank each of you for coming out today. i know school is much more important than listening to me. for those who came from the industry, thank you for taking time out of your busy days. i have had an extraordinary morning with your students. i am very optimistic about our future. because each of you give me great faith that whatever challenges the intelligence community, the national security of the united states face, we are well poised and postured to address them, at the turn them, and figure out the solutions. so take you very much for the invitation. second data point -- even in the intelligence community, the
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